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About Fruit

About Fruit 2018-03-16T15:34:18+00:00
(June – July)

Black Gold (sweet)

Dark purple, medium firm flesh – exceptional all around black sweet cherry

Hedelfingen (sweet)

Large, firm fleshed black cherry – comparable to Bing cherries

Balaton (sour)

Bright red tart cherry – good for baking

Regina (sweet)

Originated in Germany – large firm black cherry



A petite purple plum with a red, super sweet, juicy flesh


Developed in 1950 at the University of California – Delightfully sweet, deep red skin and bright red flesh – great for baking and eating


Medium yellow plum with a white sweet and juicy flesh

Ozark Premier

Thick skinned, bright red fruit with firm juicy white flesh and true full plum flavor

Burbank Red Ace

Large, firm, rich and sweet as nectar – crimson skin with honeysweet red flesh

(July – August)


Created in Ontario, Canada in 1980 – large freestone fruit that is yellow/orange in color with a firm orange flesh


Created in Ontario, Canada in 1980 – bright orange with a red blush – excellent late season apricot


Red Haven (yellow, freestone)

Medium sized, brilliant red with yellow flesh

Raritan Rose (white, freestone)

Medium-large with exceptional eating quality

Glo Haven (yellow, freestone)

Introduced by Michigan State University – large, firm and uniform in size

Loring (yellow, freestone)

Customer favorite! Large, yellow and orange skin

Blushing Star (white, freestone)

Flesh is white tinged with pink and does not brown when cut – wonderfully distinct flavor of a white peach

Crest Haven (yellow, freestone)

Created at Michigan State University – firm, highly colored skin, yellow flesh with red around the pit

Redskin (yellow, freestone)

Created at University of Maryland – cross between of J.H. Hale and Elberta – large, yellow peach with distinct red tiger stripe on skin

(August – September)

Harrow Delight (green)

Medium size, smooth flesh – early pear
Good for eating

Bartlett (green and red variety)

One of the world’s top pear varieties
Good for both eating and baking – especially canning

Bosc (brown)

Discovered in Oregon
Juicy, tender, white flesh

(September – October)

Gala (eating)

Originated in New Zealand – came to the United States in the 1970’s – cross between Kidd’s Orange Red and Golden Delicious
Crisp, juicy and very sweet

McIntosh (baking, eating)

Discovered in 1811 by John McIntosh
Juicy, tangy and tart

Honeycrisp (eating)

Developed by the University of Minnesota in 1991 – cross between a Macoun and a Honeygold
Complex sweet tart flavor, crisp

Cortland (baking, eating)

Created more than 120 years ago in Geneva, New York – cross between McIntosh and Ben Davis
Tart, tender apple that browns slower when cut

Red Delicious (eating)

Originated in 1872 in Peru, Iowa – originally called Hawkeye
Sweet and crisp

Jonagold (eating, baking)

Family Favorite!!
Created by Cornell University in 1968 – cross between Jonathan and Golden Delicious
Crisp, juicy and sweet

Mutsu/Crispin (eating, baking)

Created in Japan in the 1930’s renamed Crispin in the late 1960’s – called the Million Dollar Apple – cross between Golden Delicious and Indo Apple
Sweet, refreshing and super crisp

Idared (old favorite for baking)

Both Idaho and New York try to take credit for creating this apple – cross between Jonathan and Wagener apple
Sweetly-tart, crisp and juicy – bright white flesh
Red skin color makes beautiful pink applesauce

Nittany (eating, baking)

Created by Penn State in 1979 – cross between Golden Delicious and York
Crisp, sweet honey-tart

(Late September – October)

Edible Pumpkins and Squashes

  • Neck Pumpkins
  • Cushaw Pumpkin
  • Hubbard Squash
  • Spaghetti Squash
  • Acorn Squash
  • Butternut Squash

Decorative Pumpkins

  • Jack-o-lanterns
  • Lunch Ladies
  • Gourds
  • Fieldtrips/spookies
  • Other assorted decorative pumpkins

Visit Our Farm

We offer a variety of fresh, in-season fruits and vegetables from July to October, with pick-your-own available for most of our crops. Visit us at Gogle Farms to experience the difference. Please note we do not allow dogs on the farm.

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